The Personal Approach to Flooding

Barry Klein of the Houston Property Rights Association has a very good article on Houston’s perpetual flooding problem. Klein’s crucial point is that individuals must take responsibility for flood proofing their own properties, rather than looking to government to solve the problem.

In recent months I have decided that flood proofing needs to be routine […]

The Preservation Mob

The City is currently preparing a 225-page document that details what property owners in The Heights can and can’t do. The neighborhood is designated as an historical district, and virtually any type of construction requires the permission of city thugs bureaucrats. The Chronicle reports,

Until now, officials say, the process for permit approval has been […]

Deed Restrictions

Two of the stated purposes of zoning are preventing “incompatible” land use and protecting neighborhoods. Both of these issues can be addressed without the coercive means of zoning. Deed restrictions (or covenants) provide the means to limit land uses through voluntary, contractual means—by respecting property rights.

Deed restrictions attach to the deed for a parcel […]

The Hard Realities of Socialized Medicine

In my previous article, I explained the reasons behind the high cost of medical care in this country. With the Democrat’s Obamacare, and now the Republicans proposed American Health Care Act, America is falling into the same trap that has befallen every other western industrialized country – socialized medicine. Donald Trump and the political “right”, […]

You Can’t Please Everyone

Almost without fail, any article or discussion that in any way pertains to land use in Houston inevitably draws laments about the city’s lack of zoning. As an example, a recent article in the Chronicle was humorously complaining about the proliferation of oil change businesses and pharmacies opening in Montrose. A reader commented:

Oh, to […]

The Dishonesty of Statists

Statists aren’t known for their intellectual honesty, but on occasion they exercise such intellectual gymnastics that even Simone Biles would be impressed. A recent example comes courtesy of the Chronicle’s “Gray Matters,” a column that supposedly has the purpose of making us think about important issues.

The article is titled “Houston sidewalks aren’t improving fast […]

Affordable Housing and the Choices We Make

We have heard a great deal about the need for additional affordable housing in Houston. Advocates have told us that over 210,000 households in Harris County spend more than half their income on housing. They have told us that children in low-income neighborhoods suffer from high crime and substandard schools. But in all of these […]

Protecting Texans From Their City

The Texas House is considering a bill that would severely limit the ability of local governments to impose historic designations on private property. Under current law, local authorities have broad discretion in designation historic landmarks and subjecting such properties to government control.

As might be expected, preservationists are up in arms. Steve Sadowsky, the historic […]

Letting the Market Respond

Jerry Nickelsburg, an economist at UCLA, writes that cities such as San Francisco and Los Angeles have a shortage of affordable housing because of supply and demand. The demand for housing exceeds the supply, and so prices have risen. This is true, as far as it goes.

Just last week, the Chronicle reported that Harris […]

On the Bicycle Trail to More Land-Use Regulations

Last week, City Council approved the Houston Bike Plan. The plan is allegedly intended to expand the city’s bike trails from about 500 miles to 1,800 miles. But as I noted in my last post, the plan isn’t really about bike trails. It’s about the city assuming more control over land use in Houston.

The […]