On the Bicycle Trail to More Land-Use Regulations

Last week, City Council approved the Houston Bike Plan. The plan is allegedly intended to expand the city’s bike trails from about 500 miles to 1,800 miles. But as I noted in my last post, the plan isn’t really about bike trails. It’s about the city assuming more control over land use in Houston.

The […]

The Squeaky Bicycle Wheel Gets the Grease

Bicycle activists (I didn’t know that there were such things) achieved a significant victory this week when City Council adopted the Houston Bike Plan. Lest you think that this is a satirical piece, let me assure you that it is not. I can’t make up stuff like this.

According to the Chronicle,

the plan sets […]

The Texas Central and Eminent Domain

Texas has a reputation as a business-friendly state. But that friendliness can quickly evaporate when angry constituents start putting pressure on legislators. Last Tuesday, eighteen bills were filed in Austin to stop or impede a privately built high-speed railroad between Dallas and Houston.

Rural land owners are fighting the project, and their representatives are eager […]

No Freedom for Me, No Freedom for Thee

Last Friday, the Texas Education Agency released its first “report cards” for government schools. As expected, education bureaucrats aren’t happy with the results. As one example, Katy ISD Superintendent Lance Hindt said:

Our legislators’ ‘ranking’ and comparing of public schools feeds the agenda of those claiming our public schools are failing and vouchers, tax credits, […]

A Transportation Renaissance

Last year, Metro revised its bus routes and boasted that ridership would increase by 20 percent within two years. The Chronicle reports that overall ridership declined 4.6 percent last month and bus ridership has dropped 10 percent in the past two months.

At least one Metro executive explains the decrease as a consequence of job […]

Cronyism Versus Uber

In October, City Council signed off on a taxi hailing that will all taxi drivers in the city will be required to use. The Arro app, which is already being used in New York, Boston, San Francisco, and Chicago, will consolidate taxi dispatching for the city’s 146 taxi companies.

At the time, the Chronicle reported:

[…]

Protecting the Public From Lawmakers

In a previous post, I noted that the city had come to an agreement with Uber to loosen regulations. City Council approved the changes today, but not without dissent. According to the Chronicle:

“We are here today because one company has said if you don’t do these regulatory changes right now we’re going to leave,” […]

Go Green, or Else

In another attempt to force Houstonians to “go green,” the city is about to expand its bike-sharing program, known as Houston B-cycle. The program allows individuals to rent a bicycle from thirty-one kiosks around the city. Over the next two years the program will expand to more than one hundred kiosks.

In announcing the expansion, […]

A Partial Victory for Uber

On Wednesday, Mayor Turner announced that the City of Houston had reached a deal with Uber that will keep the ride sharing company in the city until the Super Bowl in early 2017.

Earlier this year, Uber had threatened to pull out of the Houston market because of the requirements the city was imposing on […]

Uber Versus Houston

In April, Uber threatened to pull out of the Houston market if the city didn’t relax its rules governing the ridesharing company’s drivers. At the time, Mayor Turner said:

To tell the city of Houston you either give us what we want or we are gone… is not the way you play business in the […]