On the Bicycle Trail to More Land-Use Regulations

Last week, City Council approved the Houston Bike Plan. The plan is allegedly intended to expand the city’s bike trails from about 500 miles to 1,800 miles. But as I noted in my last post, the plan isn’t really about bike trails. It’s about the city assuming more control over land use in Houston.

The […]

The Squeaky Bicycle Wheel Gets the Grease

Bicycle activists (I didn’t know that there were such things) achieved a significant victory this week when City Council adopted the Houston Bike Plan. Lest you think that this is a satirical piece, let me assure you that it is not. I can’t make up stuff like this.

According to the Chronicle,

the plan sets […]

A Flood of Altruism

More than 300,000 home owners in the Houston area can expect significant increases in their flood insurance. The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIH), which insures those homes, is more than $24 billion in debt and Congress is expected to end the subsidies that are bankrupting the program.

NFIH was created because private insurers didn’t want […]

Planning Leads to Land-use Regulations

Joe Webb, chairman of Blueprint Houston, an organization that helped draft the city’s General Plan, recently repeated the statist mantra that planning isn’t the same as zoning. At the same time, he noted that the plan will help the city control development and make neighborhoods better.

Technically, Webb is correct. Planning is a process of […]

A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Statists often like to present their policies and programs as a free market solution. Emission trading, which Wikipedia calls a “market-based approach to controlling pollution,” is one example. Carbon emission trading assigns “property rights” to emissions, which allow the holder to emit a set quantity of a particular substance. Those who emit less of that […]

Trump vs. Houston

Last week, a Chronicle editorial proclaimed that the policies of the Trump Administration will have a devastating impact on Houston. While it is true that the policies cited–a border tax, import tariffs and immigrant roundups–will have harmful effects, the paper conveniently ignores the many equally harmful consequences of policies it advocates.

A proposed border tax […]

Altruism and the Homeless

Last week, Mayor Sylvester Turner announced plans to reduce panhandling and homeless encampments in Houston. A part of the plan is the construction of “low-level shelters” under freeway underpasses. The mayor intends to introduce an ordinance that will ban tents on public property, and the taxpayer funded shelters will provide an alternative.

Turner’s “holistic” approach […]

A War Story, Part 2

I previously wrote about my experience with the city regarding a four-plex I once owned. In light of the recent media hype about “affordable housing,” it is worth revisiting that experience. While the city allegedly seeks to promote more “affordable housing” for low income Houstonians, many of its policies do the exact opposite.

About a […]

Free Will and “Affordable Housing”

Advocates of “affordable housing” are using the race card to claim that Houston is a segregated city, while ignoring the fact that the segregation that exists is on the basis of economics rather than race. This claim is intended to cloud the discussion and ignore the real issue–the choices that individuals make are the primary […]

Economic Segregation

In yesterday’s post, I examined how “affordable housing” advocates are using the race card to explain Houston’s segregated housing. The advocates are pointing to differences between wealthier neighborhoods and low-income neighborhoods to support their claims. Such claims are an attempt to cloud the issue and push a Leftist agenda.

Houston is a segregated city, but […]